Culture

From Britain with Love: James Bond, the Cold War, and British Identity

Elyn Achtymichuk (Graduate Student), Department of English, College of Arts & Science

Out of the rubble of World War II, the heroic figure of Bond rises to inspire and rejuvenate the British people in a time of social and political upheaval. This talk covers references to rationing, changing gender norms, and the global tensions of the Cold War. It can also be modified to focus on the relevance of James Bond films to present-day issues of gender and fear (longer presentations can begin with a screening).

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 minutes and up, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon and area)

 

What Is Islam?

Fachrizal Halim (Faculty Member) St. Thomas More College

Have you ever wondered what is happening to the Muslim communities across the globe nowadays? Are you interested in understanding the origins and development of Islam, its fundamental beliefs and practices, and its influence in defining Muslim cultures? This talk includes the historical development of Islamic ideas and institutions, and how Muslims have made sense of their life experiences by interpreting and re-interpreting Islam’s foundational ideas throughout time.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, requires projector and board, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

*this speaker is also willing to present on contemporary Islamic political movements, such as reactions to modernization and Westernization

Literary Topics on Jane Austen, Disability, and the Bible

Kathleen James-Cavan (Faculty Member) St. Andrew's College

I have expertise in the works of Jane Austen as well as films, videoblogs, and other spinoffs of her works in popular culture. I also research the topic of disability, both how it is experienced today and how it is represented in literature in English from 1700 onwards. Finally, I study the influence of theology on literature, and was recently ordained as a United Church minister.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon and area)

 

Back to the Old School: Public Schools and Early Hip-Hop

Amanda Lalonde (Faculty Member) Music Department, College of Arts & Science

This presentation explores the role that New York high schools played in the genesis of hip-hop. Through an examination of flyers, photographs, record cover imagery, music, and film scenes from the 1970s and early 80s, I show how public high schools helped to shape hip-hop in its early years.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 or adults, 20 to 60 minutes, projector and speakers required, English, Saskatoon and area)

Music and Nazi Germany 

Amanda Lalonde (Faculty Member) Music Department, College of Arts & Science

How did the control of the Nazi Party impact musical life in Germany in the 1930s and 40s? Which composers, performers, and musical styles were denounced or censored due to the racist and anti-Semitic cultural policies of the Third Reich? This presentation examines these questions through an exploration of both well-known and rediscovered musical works. 

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector and audio connection for laptop (flexible with audio), English, Saskatoon and area) 


Women Composers in the Romantic Period

Amanda Lalonde (Faculty Member) Music Department, College of Arts & Science

This talk explores the lives and work of two musicians: Clara Wieck Schumann and Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel. Each of these extraordinary women was fortunate to receive an excellent musical education. However, as women in the nineteenth century, they faced limitations imposed by their families and criticism in the press. My research highlights the originality and freedom of their music. 

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 20 to 60 minutes, projector and audio connection for laptop (flexible with audio), English, Saskatoon and area) 

 

English: The Strange History of a Language

Yin Liu (Faculty Member), Department of English, College of Arts & Science

It has probably occurred to most people that English is a strange language. There are historical reasons for most of its weird features, but learning about them might lead us to realise that it's even stranger than we thought. I would be happy to explore any topics, specific or general, in the history of the English language.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 90 minutes, projector and audio connection for laptop (flexible with audio), in-person or online through Zoom, English, Saskatoon and area)

 

Medieval Information Technology

Yin Liu (Faculty Member), Department of English, College of Arts and Science

Many of the ways we store, process, and deliver written information were developed in the Middle Ages, between the years 500 and 1500. My research (http://medievalcodes.ca) explores the implications of medieval information design for the information and communications technologies we are developing today.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 90 minutes, projector preferred, in-person or online through Zoom, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

 

“Hidden Words”  – translating what Thomas heard Jesus say

William (Bill) Richards (Faculty Member) College of Emmanuel & St Chad / College of Grad Studies

This presentation introduces the Gospel of Thomas, an early collection of Jesus’ sayings and proverbs, re-discovered in Egypt in the 20th century.  We look at two key questions this Gospel tries to answer, who the early Christians were who read it, and some challenges in translating its “hidden words” from Egyptian into English.

(suitable for Grade 5 - 12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, projector/screen required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations, in-person or online - Zoom)

 

The Bible – What is it? And where did it come from?

William (Bill) Richards (Faculty Member) College of Emmanuel & St Chad / College of Grad Studies

This presentation offers an overview of the different kinds of writing in the bible, according to the different religious traditions that read it, how those writings have been organized, and how the organization of those writings has evolved.

(suitable for Grade 5 - 12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, projector/screen required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations, in-person or online - Zoom)

 

Reading for Difference across the 4 Gospels (the Un-synoptic Problem)

William (Bill) Richards (Faculty Member) College of Emmanuel & St Chad / College of Grad Studies

Over the last 250 years biblical scholars have tried to clarify the complex literary relationship among Christianity's four gospels - Matthew, Mark, Luke and John - using a "synoptic" approach, by setting out their separate narratives in parallel columns, to assist comparison and contrast. Attention to "unparallel" material, however, might make for clearer distinction in each evangelist's literary style and narrative interest. 

(suitable for adults, 45 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations, in-person and online - Zoom)

“Sorcery with oil, water and bread” – the adventure of becoming a Christian in the 2nd century

William (Bill) Richards (Faculty Member) College of Emmanuel & St Chad / College of Grad Studies

Christian writers of the 2nd century produced a number of entertaining romantic novels, interweaving travelogue, miracle & dialogue – among them, the Acts of Thomas.  This presentation discusses this book, written both to amuse its readers – and to prepare them for the cycle of instruction, exorcism, prayer, anointing, and baptism that would initiate them into the movement.

(suitable for Grade 5 - 8 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, projector/screen required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations, in-person and online - Zoom)

Race and Stereotypes: Understanding and Addressing Stereotypes in Canada

Scott Thompson (Faculty Member) Department of Sociology, College of Arts & Science

This talk addresses the questions of “what is race?” and “how do we address racial stereotypes?” It starts out by explaining how widely held ideas about “race” are not supported by scientific evidence, and then explains the history behind the term, and the (non-race) reasons why Europeans were able to conquer and colonize the world. Special attention is given to Settler / First Nations relations in Canada, and “Indian” stereotypes.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, range of possible lengths, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon and area)

Science and Math

Environmental Change in the Circumpolar North

Alec Aitken (Faculty Member) Department of Geography & Planning, College of Arts & Science

This presentation begins by introducing observed changes in the Earth’s atmosphere (i.e., warming air temperatures), land (e.g., thawing permafrost), and ocean (e.g., loss of Arctic sea ice) environments. The effects of these changes on land and ocean environments are explored: landslides, ground subsidence, and tundra greenness are linked to thawing permafrost; reduction in sea ice cover is linked to loss of habitat for polar bears and seals, the introduction of new predators (i.e., killer whales). The presentation concludes with observations of the impacts of these changes on Inuvialuit (western Canadian Arctic) and Inuit (eastern Canadian Arctic) lifestyles in the 20th and 21st centuries. 

(suitable for Grades 5-12 or adults, 50 - 60 minutes, online (Zoom) and in-person, English, Saskatoon and area)

Behind the Scenes of a National Geographic Expedition to the Amazon

Alex Pelletier, Ph.D. Student, Toxicology Centre

Despite being one of the most diverse and conserved environments on the planet, we still have many more questions than answers when it comes to the Amazon Rainforest. So I joined scientists, photojournalists, anthropologists, and other researchers from all over the world to understand the mysteries of the unknown, deep in the heart of the Amazon Jungle.

(suitebale for grade 1-12, & adults; 30-90 minutes; in-person only presentations, locations: Saskatchewan, Alberta or Manitoba)

University of Saskatchewan Space Design Team

Students from the College of Engineering

The University of Saskatchewan Space Design Team (USST) is a group of students that complete various design projects that involve aerospace applications. Our team has designed rovers, space elevators, high-altitude balloons, and currently fabricating a small satellite.

(suitable for Grades 1-8, 20 to 40 minutes, presentation to be done via web video)  

Studying ecosystems, how they function, and their health using environmental DNA

Markus Brinkmann, (Faculty Member) Director, Toxicology Centre

Every lifeform, no matter how small or large, leaves behind tiny amounts of genetic material, or DNA, in its environment. This environmental DNA, or eDNA, can be collected and studied to learn new things about the ecosystems that these lifeforms inhabit. For example, scientists could ask whether an animal, such as a rare and endangered species of fish, is present in a river or lake. Or scientists could ask how many different species are present, and which services they can provide to our society, i.e., the biodiversity of a system. In this talk, we will explore the importance of biodiversity research, and how the study of eDNA can help improve our ability to study ecosystems and how they function.

(suitable for Grades 5-8, 9-12 and Adults; 30 - 60 minutes; In-person, projector required; Zoom, Microsoft Teams; English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Molds and Mycotoxins - A Hidden Danger in Food and Feed

Natacha Hogan, (Faculty Member) College of Agricultre and Bioresources/Toxicology Centre

Ingestion of fungal toxins or mycotoxins poses a serious risk to health of humans and agricultural animals worldwide. Although we are usually more concerned about man-made chemicals, mycotoxin contamination of important crops such as corn and wheat can be much more widespread. In a bad mycotoxin year, the cost of mycotoxin contamination can be enormous for farmers due to crop losses, poor animal performance, and increased veterinary costs. In this talk, we will explore some of the more important mycotoxins in Canada, the different ways they cause toxicity in agricultural animals, and how this impacts our food security.

(suitable for Grade 5 - 8, 9 - 12, and adults; 30 - 60 minutes; in-person, projector required, or Zoom/Teams for virtual presentations, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations.)

Towards Efficient Utilization of Renewable Energy

Osama Aslam Ansari (PHD Student) College of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Growing concerns about climate change have led to the increasing penetration of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar energy, in the electric grids. However, today’s electric grids were not designed to cope with highly intermittent and variable renewable energy sources. This talk will explore the concepts of smart electric grids that can significantly increase the utilization of renewable energy sources.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 or adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon and area) 

Science and Storytelling

Sandy Bonny (Instructor; Program Coordinator) College of Arts and Science

An earth scientist and literary writer, Sandy Bonny has a natural inclination to work 'science' into her stories. But how do stories work their way into science? Meta-narratives in science, including theories like plate tectonics, biological evolution, and climate change, form an evolving and adaptive framework for scientific research and problem solving. Sandy's presentation explores the roles of stories in science, alongside the science of storytelling.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 30-90 minutes, English, virtual (Zoom) or in person, Saskatoon and area)
 

A Closer Look at Selenium 

Sanjukta Choudhury (Staff Member) College of Law

Selenium - humans and animals cannot live without it, and they cannot live with too much of it. In high concentrations, this trace element may cause severe health problems, difficulty with vision can be one of them. Our study shows that selenium preferentially accumulates in the eye-lens.

(suitable for Grades 9-12, 30 minutes, projector required, English and Bangla, Saskatoon and Saskatchewan locations) 

Why Does Earth's Climate Change?

Krystopher Chutko (Faculty Member) Department of Geography, College of Arts & Science

Climate change is the most important environmental issue that affects humans. But it is a complex science and failures in understanding even the most basic concepts leads to widespread misinformation. This talk presents these concepts at several age-appropriate levels to lay the foundation for understanding climate change causes and impacts.

(suitable for Grades 1-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Virtual (ZOOM), Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations) 

 

450-Million-Year-Old Animals of Manitoba

Michael Cuggy (Instructor) Department of Geology, College of Arts & Science

A number of places in Manitoba contain exceptional soft-bodied fossils. The animals preserved in these locations can teach us about the history of life on Earth. In this talk, learn about these animals and how we find and collect them.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

 

Dark Matter and Dark Energy: How Do We Know They Exist and Why Do We Care?

Rainer Dick (Faculty Member) Department of Physics & Engineering Physics, College of Arts & Science

Dark matter is the mysterious stuff that helps to keep galaxies together. Dark energy is a form of energy that accelerates the expansion of the universe. I will introduce the different astronomical observations which prove the existence of dark matter and dark energy, and then describe the many international efforts to observe dark matter in laboratories on Earth.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations) 

 

Antimicrobial Use in Animals

Patricia Dowling (Faculty Member) Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, WCVM

This presentation is on the use of antimicrobials in food animals and companion animals and the role of the veterinarian in preventing antimicrobial resistance while also protecting the health of animals and the human food supply.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 50 minutes, requires projector/computer, English, Saskatoon)

 

Supporting Complex Digital Communications

Nadeem Jamali (Faculty Member)

Although communication takes several forms among human beings and in nature, digital communication methods are relatively limited. This talk presents work at the UofS Agents Lab on supporting more complex types of digital communication, and their applications in areas such as crowd-sourced services.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, screen required, English, Saskatoon)

 

Science isn't just test tubes: An Introduction to Biomechanics

Angelica Lang (Faculty) Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine

Biomechanics is the study of movement, with relevance both to engineering and health. The quantitative study of how the body moves provides exciting information about injuries and performance in sport, work, and daily life. This talk will cover biomechanical data collection tools, procedures, and applications to introduce this area of science.

(suitable for Grades 5 - 12, 30 - 60 minutes, English, in-person in Saskatoon area or virtual)

 

Sylvia Fedoruk: scientist, sports icon, stateswoman

Merle Massie (Staff), Coordinator, Undergraduate Research Initiatives 

Sylvia Fedoruk (1927-2012) was a Saskatchewan scientist, sports icon, and stateswoman who broke barriers to become one of Saskatchewan's leading women. Award-winning author Merle Massie is available to give short presentations of up to an hour on Sylvia's life. These presentations can be focused on a particular aspect of her life, from science (cobalt-60, betatron, and early scintillation scanner work), to sports (USask Huskies, summer softball, national level curling), to statesmanship, including becoming the first female Chancellor at USask, and becoming Saskatchewan's first female lieutenant governor in 1988. Massie may also be invited to speak about the controversy surrounding art student Christopher Lefler, whose work aimed to 'out' Sylvia as a lesbian, while she was lieutenant governor. That story can be an exceptional addition to any social science or history class about Saskatchewan's queer history, legal history, university governance, Saskatchewan media, the Saskatchewan Arts Board, and/or the Saskatchewan government.

(suitable for Grades 5 -12 and adults, 15 - 60 minutes; English; in-person or virtual; West-Central Saskatchewan)

 

 

Materials Science and the Synchrotron

Alexander Moewes (Faculty Member)

Depending on the interests of the audience, I can speak to a variety of different subjects. This includes specific topics in Materials Science (e.g. synchrotron radiation, next-generation materials for computers, condensed matter physics) as well as general topics in physics (e.g. how an acoustic guitar works, the state of Canadian science, careers in physics, why it is fun to be a graduate student).

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 90 minutes, projector preferred, English or German, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

 

Trends in the Canadian Food and Beverage Sector

Michael Nickerson (Faculty Member)

This talk will provide an overview of the Canadian food and beverage sector, hot and emerging consumer trends, and opportunities for Saskatchewan to capture.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or Regina)

Endangered Poison-Dart Frogs: How to Protect Them?

Andres Posso-Terranova (Researcher)

Under the global wave of biodiversity loss, conservation policies are urgently needed to protect constantly declining amphibian populations. In this work, I show how modern DNA technology coupled with colouration analysis is a powerful tool for the conservation of these charismatic frogs, which are considered to be amongst the most endangered species of all amphibians.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, requires computer/projector/speakers, English or Spanish, Saskatoon and area)

To Infinity and Beyond! The Mathematics of Infinity

Steven Rayan (Faculty Member), College of Arts and Science

Have you ever been curious about "infinity"? What is it really? How does it relate to numbers, counting, and the universe? Together, we'll not only find out what infinity is, but we might also discover more than one kind of infinity along the way!

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 60 minutes or less, blackboard/whiteboard preferred, English, Saskatoon or Regina)

 

What is 'nuclear' in medicine, materials, energy and the environment?

Dr. John Root (Staff)

The presentation introduces the Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation. The Fedoruk Centre is helping to advance nuclear imaging to improve diagnoses and therapies in heart disease, cancer, Parkinson's, Alzheimers, etc. This presentation describes nuclear methods for advancing materials for health, transportation and environmental protection as well as the basic idea behind nuclear generation of electricity to reduce carbon emissions. 

(suitable for Grades 9-12, 40 to 60 minutes or 60 to 90 minutes, projector preferred or whiteboard or blackboard, English, Saskatoon and area) 

 

Contributing to Food Security by Improving Seeds

Tim Sharbel (Faculty Member), College of Agriculture and Biosresoureces

My laboratory is focused on modifying plant reproduction in order to accelerate and improve crop breeding, and measuring genetic and biochemical diversity in naturally occurring medicinial plants.  This work serves to support food security, protect and respect biodiversity, and legitimize traditional medicines.

(suitable for any age, 15 to 60 minutes, projector required, English or French or German, Saskatoon,virtual presentations available)

 

Smile and Say Cheese - illumination with lasers

Amy Stevens, (Faculty), Chemistry Department

Do you every wonder how we know the distance between the earth and the moon? Do you know how barcodes are read at cash registers? Do you know why lasers are used for eye surgery? Lasers are everywhere in the world and have many, many different uses. Together we'll delve into what makes laser light special, why it is used by so many people, and how laser light that consists of pulses of energy can take snapshots of molecules.

(suitable for Grades 5 - 8, Grades 9 - 12 and Adults, 30 - 60 minutes, Powerpoint presentation, in-person in Saskatoon / virtual outside of Saskatoon - Zoom or Microsoft Teams)

 

Why Innovative Enhanced Tolerance Nuclear Fuel Should Replace Conventional Pure Urania Fuel?

Barbara Szpunar (Researcher) Department of Physics

Numerous nuclear accidents clearly illustrate the risks associated with the present design of reactors based on pure uranium dioxide fuel with low thermal conductivity that deteriorates with temperature increase and upon further oxidation. Accident tolerant nuclear fuels, by allowing for faster dissipation of heat, delay fuel melting and have increased longevity due to reduced thermal stress, therefore more economic.  

(suitable for adults, 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

 

Why We Should Listen to the Plants!

Prakash Venglat (Researcher)

Plants have survived on Earth much longer than humans have. We depend on them for food, medicine and many other raw materials. We nurture, consume, enjoy, use, worship, and destroy the plants, but hardly listen to them. Listening to their developmental plasticity tells us wonderful stories of overcoming stress, their adaptive abilities, survival, and finding ways to thrive in new environments.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon)

Sports Analytics

Keith Willoughby (Faculty Member)

I have developed a computer simulation model to predict the outcome of professional football games. The model also determines the likelihood of any team eventually winning the league championship. The Canadian Football League (CFL) regularly features the simulation model results on its website.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Horse Care and Management

Dianne Winkelman-Sim (Instructor)

People in the horse industry are subjected to a barrage of information from many sources. It can be a challenge to determine which of those sources are providing credible information. This presents the science of the horse so that people can make more informed decisions on the care and management of their horses.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Social Issues

 

Building Bridges: Overcoming Biases for a Inclusive Society

Sanjukta Choudhury (Staff Member, College of Education)

Presentation explores the critical importance of dismantling biases to create a society that embraces diversity and promotes inclusivity. This presentation delves into the various forms of bias that exist, including unconscious biases, stereotypes, and systemic biases, and highlights their negative impact on marginalized groups. It emphasizes the need for individuals and communities to actively engage in overcoming biases by fostering empathy, promoting education, and cultivating inclusive environments. By recognizing and challenging biases, we can build bridges that connect people from all backgrounds, fostering a society where everyone feels valued, respected, and included.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector/virtual, English and Bangla, Saskatoon and area)

Violence, insecurity, and inequality in international politics

Colleen Dell, Faculty (Associate Professor, Department of Political Studies, College of Arts and Science)

My research focuses on how western states use and respond to violence and in international politics.

(suitable for Grades 9  -12 and adults, 30 - 60 minutes, virtual [Zoom, Microsoft Teams], English, Saskatoon and area for in-person presentations)

Finding Love in the 21st Century: Changing Ways We Date and Couple  

Sarah Knudson (Faculty Member)

The ways in which we meet and get to know potential romantic partners have changed drastically in recent decades. Technology, a changing economy and job market, and changing ideas about what long-term relationships and marriages should offer have all contributed to these shifts. What are the implications of the changes, for our private lives and for society?

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector/computer/whiteboard preferred, English or French, Saskatoon or Vancouver or Calgary)

Disability, Connection, and Community: Social and Legal Perspectives

Sarah Knudson and Tamara Baldhead Pearl (Faculty Member and Student) 

This presentation uses interdisciplinary and Indigenous perspectives to look at challenges that persons with disabilities face as they seek to form meaningful relationships in their communities. How are stigma and social isolation barriers to relationship formation? What community resources would best support them? We offer ideas and a call to "reconcili-action"by including their voices in research. 

(suitable for Grade 9 - 12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector and whiteboard preferred, English, Saskatoon) 

 

 

How Canada Can Address Climate Change and Achieve Sustainability

Jason MacLean (Faculty Member)

How can Canada meet its commitments under the UN Paris Climate Change Agreement and Sustainable Development Goals? This talk outlines the law and policy obstacles and opportunities in Canada today.

(suitable for adults, 30 to 90 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon)

Sustainability, Human Rights, and the Evolution of Corporate Law

Jason MacLean (Faculty Member)

Holding corporations accountable for human rights abuses and environmental harms is one of law’s most daunting challenges. This talk describes an emerging form of transnational corporate law capable of increasing corporate accountability and driving greater sustainability.

(suitable for adults, 30 to 90 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon)

Taxes and You

Devan Mescall (Faculty Member)

My focus is on how changing tax policy affects our decisions both as individuals and as corporations. While my research is primarily in a multinational setting, I am happy to speak on broader questions of tax policy or current issues. My goal is always to remove the complexities around tax to make it accessible and relevant to the particular interests of the audience.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Science, Technology and Innovation

Peter Phillips (Faculty Member)

This talk discusses the ways we make choices about advanced technologies (e.g. new foods, production techniques, consumer goods). It also address the social and economic impacts of those choices. Depending on the audience, the presentation can be conceptual or case-based, general or technical.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

So, You Wish to Lead - What Might be Good to Reflect Upon?

Anurag Saxena (Faculty Member), College of Medicine

Whether you are considering or are in a leadership role, understanding your motivation and ability to lead are pivotal to be effective at present and in the future. We will explore how "leader developmental readiness" - your motivation, self-awareness, ability to reflect, goal orientation, confidence, and role complexity influence your own evolution as a leader and in identifying leadership talent.

(suitable for Grades 9 - 12 and adults, 60 minutes, in-person or virtual, English, Saskatoon,(virtual or in-person) and other Saskatchewan locations (Virtual)

Leading and Working Across Boundaries

Anurag Saxena (Faculty Member), College of Medicine

Working harmoniously with and leading others effectively across boundaries requires cooperation and collaboration. The boundaries represent mindsets, interests, culture, structures. processes, mission and vision. We will explore means to simultaneously reduce conflict and increase kinship across boundaries towards synergy. The aims are to achieve shared goals and more meaningful and valued relationships. It can be done and it does work!

(suitable for Grades 9 - 12 and adults, 60 minutes, in-person or virtual, English, Saskatoon,(virtual or in-person) and other Saskatchewan locations (Virtual)

 

Surveillance, Privacy, and Society: Big Brother to Edward Snowden

Scott Thompson (Faculty Member)

This talk addresses the questions of “what is surveillance?” and “how is it shaping our daily lives?” It starts with why privacy is important, and then discusses what surveillance is and how it is impacting us day to day. Special attention will be paid to social media, police carding, government surveillance, and consumer surveillance, as well as what can be done about intrusions to privacy.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, range of possible lengths, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon and area)

The Coming Demographic Shift: Human Resource and Career Pattern Implications

Rosemary Venne (Faculty Member)

This presentation begins with an overview of Canada’s changing demographic profile, followed by tracing changes in career patterns in the post-war period. Currently we have flattening corporate hierarchies, rising skill requirements, less promotion-centred careers, and lifelong learning. What are the best retention policies and leadership strategies to deal with changing career patterns, population shifts, and generational differences?

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 50-60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

City Planning and Inspired Urbanism

Ryan Walker (Faculty Member)

NOTE: Ryan Walker is on Sabbatical until June 30, 2021.

Cities are fascinating and vital to our society. This talk is about how good urbanism is fueled by careful attention to design, environment, social, cultural, and economic dimensions. Thriving cities require attention to each of these dimensions, rather than privileging one or two at the expense of the others. City planning is at the centre of this important enterprise.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

 

Health


AI and Robotics in Medicine: Will They Replace Medical Staff?

Abbas Al-Zubaidi (Researcher)

Artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics are rapidly developing areas. What will their role in the healthcare system be during this 4th industrial revolution? How far could we go with these technologies? Will they replace medical staff for nursing, consultation, diagnosis, surgery, or other areas? This talk will address these questions and highlight futuristic clinical technologies.

(suitable for adults, 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Herbal Medicines: Do They Work? Are They Safe?

Stan Bardal (Faculty Member)

The use of natural health products (NHP) is a big business, and their popularity is rising. This talk will provide a general overview of the process involved in regulating NHP, as well as focus on the pharmacology (mechanisms of action, safety) and evidence of benefit (or not) for a number of commonly used NHP.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 40 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or Prince Albert)

How Drugs Work and Why They Sometimes Cause Harm

Stan Bardal (Faculty Member)

This talk reviews the general mechanisms by which drugs carry out their effects, both beneficial effects and side effects. By obtaining a better understanding of how their medications work, patients may be empowered to ask better questions of their care providers and play more of an active role in managing their health.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 40 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or Prince Albert)

Maternal Mental Health

Angela Bowen (Faculty Member)

Maternal mental health affects 1 in 5 women in Saskatchewan. I give public and professional talks about anxiety and depression in pregnant and postpartum women. I share the resources we have developed and discuss the changes we have made across the province.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon and area)

*this speaker can also present on Indigenous Birth. 

 

Growing Older in Place of Choice

Roslyn Compton (Faculty Member)

The focus of my research is to find approaches to healthcare that support older adults to age in their choice of place. These approaches take an interprofessional approach, which values clients and caregivers’ independence and engagement in their care. It is important to see the client not as a disease or diagnosis, but rather as a person with experiences.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 or adults, 30 to 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

The Health Benefits of Having a Dog in Your Life

Colleen Dell (Faculty Member)

Ever wondered why you felt good when you were around a dog? In this presentation, learn about the latest science behind our relationship with dogs and how it provides amazing benefits to our health. We'll discuss both companion dogs and therapy dogs, and also learn a little bit about how humans are beneficial for dog health. A St. John Ambulance therapy dog will be on site to demonstrate.

(suitable for any age, range of possible lengths, requires pet-friendly location, English, Saskatoon and area)

 

How Nutrition Can Change the Behaviour of Your Genetic Code (for Health and Long Life)

Christopher Eskiw (Faculty Member)

The entirety of our genetic code (called the genome) provides the basic blueprint for what we could become. Although we cannot change the code, we can change how the code is read. My research in nutritional genomics focuses on how specific compounds from the foods we eat can change how our genetic material is interpreted, leading to increased health and longevity.

(suitable for Grades 5-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, requires projector/board, English, Saskatoon and area)

Should Dysfunction in Breast Cancer Suvivors

Soo Kim (Faculty Member)

An estimated 24000 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in Canada in 2016; about 700 of these will be in Saskatchewan. Survivorship has increased but post-treatment shoulder dysfunction has become a formidable problem. Are there important musculoskeletal risk factors we can identify that may help improve screening, prevention and rehabilitation care for breast cancer survivors?

(suitable for adults, 30 to 40 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

What You Need to Know About Dentures

Rick Kroener (Staff Member)

As a dental technician with 35+ years of experience, I would like to educate people about dentures – the harm and the good they can do. As a technician, I see many things a dentist does not encounter. I also have seen people’s lives change and improve in ways most cannot imagine. This needs to be talked about!

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector preferred, English or German, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations) 



How does the way we move influence injury risk at work?

Angelica Lang, (Faculty), Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine

Body posture and movement patterns are closely tied to musculoskeletal injuries and disorders, especially at work. This talk will provide an overview of the risk factors for injuries in different types of tasks and occupations to enhance understanding of why they might happen and how they can be prevented.

(suitable for adults, 30 - 60 minutes, English, in-person in Saskatoon and area or virtual)

 

Causes of and Exercises to Treat Urinary Incontinence in Adults

Stéphanie Madill (Faculty Member)

Urinary incontinence, and related problems such as urgency, affect a significant proportion of adults, both men and women. These problems can significantly impact individuals’ physical activity, mental health and sexuality. Pelvic floor muscle exercises can be an effective treatment for these problems.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, range of possible lengths, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon or Edmonton)

 

A 'Backstage Pass' to a Kidney Transplant from One Person to Another

Mike Moser (Faculty Member)

Even after 20 years, I remain amazed that we can take an organ from one person, keep it alive, and then put it into another person. Many discoveries had to come together including surgical techniques, organ preservation, and drugs to prevent rejection. From the first call to the patient leaving the operating room with a working kidney, I will show you how it happens. I have been giving versions of this talk for 15 years.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 minutes, requires projector/video/speakers, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Saskatchewan Pioneers the NanoKnife: A Safer Cancer-Killer

Mike Moser (Faculty Member)

The NanoKnife is a new technology that can destroy tumors without the use of heat or radiation and therefore minimizing collateral damage. Safety around blood vessels, nerves, and ducts means hope for some tumors that were previously considered untreatable. Saskatoon is only the second center in Canada to offer NanoKnife to our patients. This technology will become an important tool in the fight against many types of cancer in the next decade.

(suitable for adults, 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Male Sexual Dysfunction 

Andries Muller (Faculty Member)

General information about the management of erectile dysfunction and testosterone treatment for medical reasons. Sessions can be adjusted for different audiences. 

(suitable for adults, 15 to 60 minutes, projector required, English and Afrikaans, Saskatoon and within 300 kms)  


Spinal Cord Injury and Electronic Implants for Restoring Function

Jonathan Norton (Faculty Member)

Implants to electrically stimulate nerves can restore critical functions after spinal cord injuries, such as bladder and bowel functions. We are implanting these into clinical practice and developing new devices that may allow for the restoration of other functions such as walking.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 10 to 60 minutes, projector or board required, English, Saskatoon or Regina or Prince Albert)

The Earliest Origins of Health and Disease in a Person's Life

Alan Rosenberg (Faculty Member)

Most chronic diseases have their origins before the disease becomes apparent. There is evidence that genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors during pregnancy or in early childhood might influence the occurrence of disease later in the child’s life. This talk will cover current research that is investigating these factors.

(suitable for adults, 30 to 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

Accelerator to Hospital: Turning Science into Nuclear Medicine

Dale Schick-Martin (Staff Member)

A routine method of finding tumors within the body is PET (positron emission tomography) scanning. But this relies on "tracer" chemicals that are very short-lived. The radiopharmacies that produce these tracers are an intersection of physics, chemistry, logistics, and healthcare. I’ll discuss how these disciplines all come together to reliably produce these critical drugs everyday.

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 30 to 60 minutes, projector preferred, English, Saskatoon) 

How a Medical School Can Be Good for Your Health

Preston Smith (Faculty Member)

When you have a medical school in your community (your city, region or province), you are healthier as a result. The academic interactions supported by a medical school—from enhanced training and professional development opportunities to locally led and conducted research—create a culture of local knowledge and awareness that doesn’t exist when learning and discovery take place greater distances away.

(suitable for adults, 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon and Regina)

 

Supply Chain Management

Keith Willoughby (Faculty Member) Edwards School of Business

Supply chain management involves the creation and distribution of products.  The goal is to provide availability of product to satisfy consumer demand.  Demand surges (as with the COVID-19 pandemic) place strain on supply chains.  Organizations have developed strategies to effectively deal with these supply chain challenges.

(suitable for Grade 9 - 12 and adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon: in-person and SK:online)

 

Health Care Process Improvement

Keith Willoughby (Faculty Member) Edwards School of Business

Patients can experience long waits and delays in health care processes. “Lean” has been espoused as an approach to improve system performance. I can speak on the promise (and pitfalls) on using these approaches to analyze health care processes.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon: in-person and SK:online)

How to Live to Be 100

Thomas Wilson (Faculty Member)

The “warranty” for humans appears to be about 85 years. Stretching this to 100 will be difficult, given the genetic contribution to longevity. However, we can increase our chances of reaching the “century” by proper diet, exercise, and detecting and treating cardiovascular risk factors.

(suitable for adults, 45 minutes, projector required, English, Saskatoon)

New Hepatitis C Treatments: Too Good to Be True?

Alexander Wong (Faculty Member)

The development of direct-acting antivirals to treat hepatitis C infections has been called a medical miracle. But many obstacles still stand in the way of worldwide distribution, such as high costs and difficulties in engaging with vulnerable populations. This talk will provide a history of the hepatitis C virus, an update on current and anticipated treatments, and a discussion of challenges that remain.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, requires projector/remote, English, Saskatoon or Regina)

*this speaker is also willing to present on other chronic viral infections (e.g. HIV, hepatitis B)

Education

PowerPoint is not your friend: Public Speaking Tips for the 21st Century 

Rebekah Bennetch (Faculty Member) 

Just because PowerPoint slides are free, doesn't mean your presentation should be full of them. This talk gives a quick overview of the discipline of rhetoric, and how an understanding of persuasion can help shape your presentation into an engaging and relevant talk that your audience will remember (and appreciate!). 

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, projector required and sound system for video, English, Saskatoon)

How Can We Communicate Effectively?

Samantha Ekanayake (Staff Member)

In a digital communication era, social media and communication devices have led to overshadow and neglect the importance of effective communication. People who communicate effectively are instantly recognized as leaders. Effective communication is not an inborn talent, and can be mastered as a learnable, practical skill like any other skill. I will discuss concepts and rules of speech, speech delivery methods and styles, speech preparation and presentation. 

(suitable for Grades 9-12 and adults, 45 to 60 minutes, requires projector/internet, English, Saskatoon and area) 

 

Follow Your Bliss: Stay Connected to That Which You Love upon Leaving High School

Dean McNeill (Faculty Member)

This is an inspirational talk on what high school-aged students should consider when examining their options (university and otherwise) upon high school graduation. It is applicable to high, middle, and low academic achievers, and is not an attempt to convince all high school students that university is for them. The speaker has given this talk over 40 times.

(suitable for Grades 9-12, 60 minutes, requires projector/speaker, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Educating for Diverse Perspectives on Food Processing, Safety and Security

Venkatesh Meda (Faculty Member)

Interdisciplinary education, research and academic collaboration are in huge demand due to rapidly changing demographics, technology revolution and globalisation. In order to manage global food security, safety and quality, the education sector needs rapid adjustment strategies and new training opportunities, affecting both trainers and students.

(suitable for adults, 40 to 60 minutes, projector/whiteboard preferred, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

 

Soft Skills and Professional Tips for the Office

Karen Mosier (Staff)

What most new employees lack today are soft skills. Soft skills are not like hard skills, such as typing, writing, or how to use software programs which are more commonly taught. Often overlooked, soft skills such as fostering good interoffice relationships, implementing good communication strategies, practicing effective email communication, being aware of your nonverbal communication, developing a thorough work plan, and perfecting your time management skills are just as vital for career success.

(suitable for adults, 40 to 60 minutes, in-person and virtual presentations)

 

Deconstructing the Art of Grantsmanship

Karen Mosier (Staff)

What most new employees lack today are soft skills. Soft skills are not like hard skills, such as typing, writing, or how to use software programs which are more commonly taught. Often overlooked, soft skills such as fostering good interoffice relationships, implementing good communication strategies, practicing effective email communication, being aware of your nonverbal communication, developing a thorough work plan, and perfecting your time management skills are just as vital for career success.

(suitable for adults, 40 to 60 minutes, in-person and virtual presentations) 


The New Old Education

Raymond Spiteri (Faculty Member)

I will speak about 1) my experience with using “new” technology for teaching, specifically the flipped classroom, team-based learning, and mobile apps for practice tests; 2) the impact of this new technology in terms of education and student learning; and 3) a vision for what the classroom of the future will look like and how we can start embracing it now.

(suitable for any age, 60 minutes, projector required and wireless access preferred, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Struggling Learners with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Linda Wason-Ellam (Faculty Member)

Most children diagnosed with FASD struggle academically. These learners have a wide range of language, thinking, and attention difficulties resulting in low reading and writing achievement. Nevertheless, they can learn but they learn differently. My work shows success when multiple methods of learning are available, such as art, drumming, storytelling, singing, and visual aids.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, projector/whiteboard preferred, English, Saskatoon and area)

Arts-Based and Place-Based Education for Young Minds

Barbara Wotherspoon (Instructor)

This talk acknowledges the integral role of the arts, nature and contemplation in the structural and functional development of children’s minds. It critiques current education that individualizes and “separates” children from each other, the natural world, and their inner selves; and it envisions practice that promotes children’s natural tendencies for compassion, imaginative collaboration and instinctual connection to all living beings.

(suitable for adults, 60 minutes, no technology requirements, English, Saskatoon or other Saskatchewan locations)

Help

Please note that a speaker's willingness to travel outside of Saskatoon is often dependent on being reimbursed for travel costs. Also, do not hesitate to fill out the request form or send a general inquiry, even if you are unsure about meeting a speaker's requirements. We welcome the opportunity to discuss any possibilities.